Salmon saute class on August 31st

It is my last day to give cooking class in August.   It had been humid and warm weather during summer.   I’m glad to give  many classes and met many people from over the world.

I welcomed a couple from France for cooking salmon sauté with vegetables in miso sauce and Inari-zushi ( sushi).  They liked inari-zushi so wanted to make how to make.

I like inari-zushi, and honestly I buy them rather than home making since it takes time to prepare it.   Although I make it annually or twice a year when I prepare for family event, home made Inari-zushi is much tastier than the store bought.

First, we cooked rice and making vinegar sushi rice. Meanwhile we cook fried tofu in seasonings and let them cool in room temperature. Then making small rice balls and put the balls into the fried tofu pockets.

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The couple also cooked Tamago-yaki, Japanese egg omelet and tuna Temari-sushi as well.

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Finally we  made big lunch and the couple enjoyed the meal.

As long as you can get fried tofu and fundamental Japanese seasonings, you can make your own Inari-zushi.

Hope you enjoy making inari-zushi back your home!

Many Thanks!

Kisshy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chicken Karaage class on August 30th

I welcomed 3 people for the class this morning.  Two young ladies from US and also young lady from Belgium.  The ladies from US requested chicken kara-age, Japanese style chicken fry.

I like to cook with young ladies who came from different countries.  We become closer during cooking time and eventually become like “friends”  during meal time.

This class was also joyful class. Since especially two girls from US would like to learn Japanese cooking, we didn’t have extra chat during cooking. However, after break time, we had such a great time to talk and lol.

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One lady speaks Japanese and I was impressed she studies by herself! That encouraged me to improve my English.

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They wanted to know how to cook Tempura too, so I showed cooking tempura with few vegetables.  They liked them!

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Thank you for the great time, girls!

Kisshy

 

Salmon Nanban-zuke class on August 25th

I welcomed beautiful couple from Munich in German.   The lady speaks and understand Japanese little. Both of them are Japanese food lover.

After our communication by email, we decide to cook Salmon nanban-zuke for the main dish.

Both of them are home cookers, so we cooked very fast and efficiently.

I usually prepare Japanese broth, using sea kelp and bonito flakes. Those ingredients only use for infuse the flavor, so i usually discard the left overs after simmered ingredients.  I knew, this is kind of against Japanese culture, mottai-nai .

*Mottainai from wiki

Mottainai (もったいない[mottainai]) is a Japanese term conveying a sense of regret concerning waste.[1] The expression “Mottainai!” can be uttered alone as an exclamation when something useful, such as food or time, is wasted, meaning roughly “what a waste!” or “Don’t waste.”[2] In addition to its primary sense of “wastefulness”, the word is also used to mean “impious; irreverent” or “more than one deserves”.[3]

Mottainai is an old Buddhist word, which has ties “with the Shinto idea that objects have souls.”[2] Mottainai has been referred to as a tradition,[2] a cultural practice,[4] and an idea which is still present in Japanese culture,[2] which has become an international concept.[5]

 

Then I decided to cook furikake, using leftover of Japanese broth, which is go with cooked rice.  See in the middle of the plate in white little dish.

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We cooked Salmon nanban -zuke, cucumber with creamy sesame dressing, eggplant with sweet miso sauce, Japanese style egg omelette, furikake, edamame rice and miso soup.

Both of them loved those dishes, and I’ m so glad they enjoyed.  The lady sent me Japanese meal cooked by herself. It looked so gorgeous and much better than my work.

Thank you for remind me of Mottainai!

Many thanks,

Kisshy

 

 

Seafood ramen class on August 24th

I welcomed a couple from Australia this morning.   They requested ramen as a main dish.

Since I got their booking the day before evening, so I din’t have  enough time to prepare for braised pork for ramen which regularly accompanied with ramen topping.  However, I could prepare for  seafood ramen, the recipe calls salmon and shrimp, that doesn’t need so much time but produce nice testes.

We made pieces of gyoza as well as seafood ramen at the class. Amazingly, the lady made fabulous pieces of gyoza! She is like a professional, eventually i learned how to make gyoza.

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Look at this beautiful wrapped gyozas!!

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Ephemerally, the gyoza I made was not on this tray. haha. Now  I got how to do this and I can share how to wrap nicely to class participants.

I heard she grown up in Chinese family and her mother is good at making gyoza. however, she said the wrapper in Japan is thinner than Japanese and the cookery is different from her family recipe.

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She liked Japanese style gyoza very much and that is a relieve!

Hope you enjoy cooking seafood ramen and gyoza.

Many thanks,

Kisshy

Gyoza class on August 23rd

I welcomed a couple from Vancouver for the class this morning.  They requested gyoza as a main dish.  Gyoza itself is easy cooking, so i offer making different types of gyoza at the class.

We prepare regular pork gyoza, chicken and shrimp gyoza, and cook as both pan plying and deep flying.

Pan fried gyoza is a common dish, and deep flying is not as common in restaurants, but  “oishii“, yummy too. The fried wrapper become crispy, which go with cold beer. ( Sorry, i don’t serve beer in the class though)

Every participants concentrate filling goza in wrappers.

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We made pan-fried gyoza, deep fried gyoza, cucumber with creamy sesame dressing, pan fried eggplant with miso sauce, bonito sashimi, edamame rice and miso soup.

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Great Job!

 

Many thanks,

Kisshy

 

A private class on August 7th

I welcomed a lady from UK this morning.  She requested salmon-nanban marinade as a main dish.

During our cooking, she asked me how to cook tempura, so I decided to cook vegetable tempura as a side dish. She liked shiso leaves tempura, crispy green leaves, as you see in the middle of tempura plate.

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She said she will use fresh sage leaves in her garden instead of shiso leaves.  That is such a great idea!

Many people from outside of japan  keen to cook this shiso tempra at their home, but it is not easy to find except Japan unfortunately.  Then her advise reminds me for cooking school in NY, I learned the crispy fried sage garnish, which is slimier to tempura.  I’ll let the people that sage leave is good substitution  from now on!

 

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She liked the food we prepared very much. We have time to talk about her life in London and her trip in Japan.  It was really interesting and time flied.

Hope you cook fresh sage tempura to your loving grand children!

Many thanks!

Kisshy

Salmon nanban marinade class on August 6th

I welcomed 3 girls today for my cooking class.  We cooked salmon – nanban marinade, cucumber dressed creamed sesame, pan fried eggplant with miso sauce, rice and miso soup.

I served fresh bonito sashimi as extra seasonal dish.  I’d love my guests to taste something seasonal small dish, which may not encounter the taste for non-Japanese people  at common restaurants.

Serving fresh bonito sashimi with julienne fresh Japanese herbs is one of our Japanese summer delight. We eat the bonito sashimi with ginger and vinegar sauce instead of wasabi and soy sauce.

Also we prepare edamame-rice. Edamame is also now in season. I thought  fresh edamame, I meant non- frozen, might be unusual for visitors.

I’m glad to share the people come to my class and find something new “real” Japanese taste.

Today’s participants enjoyed those tastes pretty much so I’m glad to hear that.

 

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Hope you enjoy the trip in Japan, and hope you will become familiar to cook Japanese food!

 

Many thanks,

Kisshy

 

Gyoza & Nanban Zuke Class in August, 2017

It was a mid-summer day and we are all sweating but sizzling hot Gyoza on grill pan tasted good as ever! 

I welcomed a newly engaged couple and a foodie mother & daughter, both pairs from Australia.

They all worked hard at my kitchen and prepared 2 main dishes at this class, Gyoza and Nanban Zuke of swordfish.  These menus require a lot of fine chopping of vegetables but the team was quite experienced cookers so we had no problem at all. 

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The most part of the menu for this class were actually requested from another guest, a young lady who has taken my class back in May this year. She liked Nanban Zuke and our side dishes so much that she recommended the same menu to her family visiting her in Tokyo. 

Some guidebooks say Tokyo is too hot and humid so not a good place to visit in August.  But for foodie travelers, cooking class is always fun and we are always ready to welcome you with something seasonal. 

I hope my Aussie guests liked Japanese style cooking experience at my place.

Many thanks for coming!

Akiko

Sushi rolls class with foodie sisters / July 2017

It was early July but quite hot and humid on this day. I welcomed sisters from Canada who chose to prepare Sushi rolls and a few side dishes.   

Our summer is so muggy that you will understand the reasons why Japanese cooking uses lots of vinegar.  Even though I love freshly cooked plain white rice, July and August are probably not the best month to taste it, just because it is so muggy.  

Sushi rice is seasoned with rice vinegar, sugar and a little salt. It tastes good even after cooled down, so ideal as food for our summer season.

We also made a side dish for summer, thinly sliced cucumbers & chicken tender, seasoned with white sesame sauce. The toasty flavor of sesame and chilled cucumber are nice and refreshing on hot day.

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At this class, one of my guests had already taken another Sushi making class after arriving Tokyo and she surprised me with beautiful sushi rolls! She also left some interesting comments on Japanese seasonings at tasting, such as ‘taste of plum’ for red Miso, ‘fudge’ for sweet and savory white Miso sauce for eggplants. 

All these expressions are important to describe our food and I am learning a lot from my guests at each class. 

Many thanks for coming!

Akiko