Japanese Sweets Class for French Girl

I’ve welcomed a student from Paris. She was interested in to make Japanese sweets, especially “Dorayaki“.  Dorayaki is Japanese confection, which is red bean pancake.

 

We made Dorayaki, Japanese cheese cake and fruits mochi sweets.

 

She made a good shaped fruits daihuku.  Wrapping mochi  with white bean paste and small orange was not easy though.

Making pancakes for dorayaki.

She saw Japanese movie “Sweet Bean (An)” then was interested in  dorayaki as Japanese confectionary.  She said the movie is amazing and recommended me to see that.  Yes, I will!

She made beautiful colored pancake for dorayaki.

 

Thank you for coming my sweets class!

 

Kisshy

Pork Ramen & Gyoza class

My guest for this class was a group of Galician and French couples. It was their annual reunion trip and I was honored to be part of their vacation in Tokyo.

Our lunch menu:

Pork Ramen with Miso meat sauce, stir fried vegetables, soy sauce flavored egg, pork slice as toppings

Pork and vegetable Gyoza

Crushed cucmber salad

Lots of questions and lots of fun talks! My male guests were very keen to use Japanese vegetable knives and I love the way they paused for a photo, Spanish Samurai at my kitchen!?

Ramen soup has 3 components, pork bone soup stock, Japanese Dashi stock with smoked bonito, dried sardine and sun-dried Shiitake mushroom, and simmered pork sauce of soysauce & Mirin. We also prepare a variety of topping so it tales a lot of work and preparation to make this simple bowl of hot noodles.

At the class we also made Japanese style pork dumplings, Gyoza. The recipe is originally from China like Ramen,  but it is now a very common food for all Japanese families to cook & eat at home. We mainly grill the dumplings, then put the lid and steam to finish up our Gyoza.

I hope my guests enjoyed their time at my kitchen,

Many thanks for coming!

Akiko

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bento Box & Gyoza Class ~May 2018~

My kids go to school with their Bento Box every day. In Japan, it is very common to bring your own box for lunch. Some mothers make such a pretty Bento Box and it is now a popular item on SNS, that is where my French guests from Luxemburg got an idea of making Bento Box in Tokyo.

 

We actually have a variety of Bento boxes accordingly to seasons, occasions etc. At this class, I chose a bamboo-made box of rectangular shape, nice for early summer entertainment table.

 

Inside of the Box are:

Onigiri(rice balls with Nori-seaweed)

Beef and Shiso(minty herb) roll with grated Daiokn radish sauce

Sweet egg roll etc….

 

For Bento Box, every item needs to be tiny and easy to handle. The menu required a lot of hand works but my guests did everything very neat & beautiful!

My guest couple also prepared Gyoza, Japanese style pork dumplings.

 

All turned out really delicious but hot sizzling Gyoza was definitely one of the best tastes for my guests.

 

Many thanks for coming & Merci Beaucoup!

Akik

Sashimi Class on Aug 4th

I had a couple from Scotland at the class and they requested preparing  Sashimi at the class.

I always ask how do you prepare sashimi, because we rarely prepare it from whole fish at home. Honestly, when I prepare sashimi for family meal, I usually buy precut sashimi and serve in plates, no effort.

After our communication, I found out the couple is interested in to cut the fish block nicely  and prepare rightly in plates,  which is capable for me.

Then I started researched how to plate Sashimi in certain way and had practiced cutting and slicing sashimi using salmon and tuna. My cooking teacher at Egami cooking school, authentic Japanese cooking school, gave  me advices, I really appreciated.   Even though I learned raw fish cutting techniques at French cooking class at NY, the way  is different because the cooking knife is different.  Eventually I learned a  lot about Japanese cooking and culture for preparing the Sashimi class.

The cooking class was wonderful with a couple who love Japanese food. The area they live don’t have grocery store, but they often order ingredients on internet. I’m impressed their effort to cooking Japanese food.

At the end, the couple did very well to cut sashimi and plating nicely. IMG_5821

I’m so glad to get email from them after they got back to heir home which includes the picture they plated sashimi with fresh Scottish salmon beautifully.

Hope you enjoy Japanese cooking!

Many thanks,

Kisshy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sushi roll class : Sushi is Japanese daily meal?

Today is my 4th Sushi lesson in Jul. The participants came from UK and Australia. The lady from UK is an enthusiast for learning maki-zushi, and she brought newly met her friend to the class. Both ladies are lovely and I had great time with them.

Rolling sushi seems difficult that  students in my class say before practice. However, everyone makes beautiful rolls once they get some tips.

People often asks me if  sushi roll is made for daily family meal?  It is depend on the each family but I answer sushi roll is mainly  made for occasional meal, such as celebrating birthday, festivals and ceremonies. Also sushi is convenient for outside meal since you can eat with fingers, without chopsticks. Making Maki-zushi is not a daily meal, too much tasks.

Embarrassingly, I haven’t made sushi roll before I began to teach Japanese cooking for tourists since my culinary background is French cooking….poor excuse!  However, once I get to make rolls it is easier than I expected.  I failed time to time then I got how to make visually nice rolls. I did same experience with the students in my class, so I understand what is difficult points for the first tries.

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I’ m always happy to see the students made great rolls!

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Many Thanks!

Kisshy

Vegetarian & Pork Gyoza & Miso Aubergine class / July 2017

Gyoza, Japanese style dumplings are becoming one of the most popular main dishes these days. It is fun to make, yummy to taste!  If you have several guests who have different dietary requirement, you can simply prepare different types of fillings.  Some with pork, some with vegetables, which is what I did at this class. 

I welcomed 4 girls from Ireland and USA on this day and 2 were vegetarians, so we prepared 2 types; pork Gyoza & mushrooms and tofu Gyoza. Both Gyoza also had vegetables like cabbage and same seasonings.  

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Once wrapped, they all look exactly the same so just be careful when you cook them to remember which is which. 

My guests also liked our side dish with eggplant.  In Japanese, eggplant is called ‘Nasu’, a simple short spelling but some Europeans call it ‘aubergine’, sounds more like a French dish with complicated technique but this is another easy and yummy home cooking menu.  

The Miso sauce for this menu is sweet and savory. It is hard to explain the taste so you must come and try yourself!

I also learned one new thing about Irish culture from my guests, Leprechaun. Another long spelling but I am a fan of Harry Potter so this was easy to remember. I hope this little man will bring a lot of happiness and good luck to my guest girls from west and east of Japan.

Many thanks for coming!

Akiko

 

Ramen & Gyoza cooking with Aussie & French couples / May 2017

By late May, weather in Japan would get quite humid, with our rainy season approaching. Yet we still received quite a few inquiries for hot noodle dish with soup, Ramen.  Indeed it is surprising but I am well aware now that Ramen has truly become one of the most popular Japanese dish around the world. 

On this class, I welcomed two young couples from Australia and France.  I put my air conditioner on so it is cool enough in the room to enjoy hot foods.

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Besides Ramen, we prepared Gyoza, Japanese style pot stickers or dumplings. This dish is also originated from Chinese culinary but we pan-fry them with a lid, instead of boil or steam. When cooked, we dip them in soy sauce and vinegar. If you like it hot and spicy, maybe add a few drips of Chinese hot chili oil which we call La-Yu. 

At my family, whenever eating Gyoza for dinner, we cook them on the table. There is a popular kitchen item called ‘hot plate’, which is actually a big and flat electric frying pan.  

The beauty of using this on the table is;

1) it saves a lot of time for cooking,

2) everyone can enjoy eating Gyoza while it is sizzling hot.

The only problem is your room might be full of Gyoza smell afterwards. If the weather permits, have your windows open, or put your kitchen fan switched on. 

Gyoza is often chosen as a menu for family and close friends casual gathering. It is also fun to warp them together, while chatting various things, as we did on this class!

In Japan, Gyoza wrappers are available at any supermarkets so we don’t make them from scratch. I am not sure about the situation overseas but hope my guests can find them with no problem at their home towns. 

Many thanks for coming!

Akiko

Flower bud as a spring delicacy on April 24th Tempura class

I welcomed a couple from Quebec, Canada and the lady turned out to be a professional working at the culinary institute. Her husband had lived in Tokyo for some years before and very knowledgeable about our food culture so I was quite nervous not to disappoint them with my cookings. 

Both of them were such lovely foodies, who really enjoy cooking. We were chatting and chatting about all kinds of foods and it was such a fun time!

They liked Tempura and my easy side dish of crushed cucumbers very much, while they told me that sweet egg roll omelet was a little strange taste for them, as French omelet is always savory. It is truly interesting to know what is appealing and what is not so.

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 For this Tempura occasion, I picked up our popular spring delicacy, called ‘Fuki no Tou’ as one of the ingredients for deep frying. I googled up the English translation of Fuki, which was ‘butterbur scape’ or Petasites japonicas.  Does it make sense?  Maybe it is not eaten much outside Japan.  Here is a photo of Fuki no Tou.

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Fuki is a kind of vegetable and it looks like Rhubarb but the taste is totally different. Only around spring time, buds of Fuki flowers are available and I like to eat them as Tempura. It has some bitterness along freshness, appreciated as a sign of early spring nutrition.

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My guests from Quebec liked Fuki no Tou, as well as prawns, eggplants, Shiso leaves, Okura, Kabocha pumpkins etc. I hope they enjoyed their cooking experience at my kitchen as much as I did.

Many thanks for coming!

Akiko

Japanesae cooking class on Oct 13th’16

The cooking class guests today came from Boston  and Seattle in US. I had a request for  Chicken Karaage  as the main dish.

A young couple from Boston had traveled in Japan for a couple of weeks and they flew back to Boston the next day of the class. The other guest, traveled alone  has a culinary background and she is interested in Japanese traditional cooking. It was a great time to cook together with them.

We usually cook bonito dashi stock at the beginning of the class. This stock is fundamental of Japanese taste like chicken stock for French cooking. We cooked the stock at this time as well and shared little cup of the liquid for the tasting.

They “Kanpai!”  Japanese meaning of Cheers! with the stock. I’m glad they understand such aromatic dashi stock flavor.

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  Today’s menu on Oct 13th

Chicken Kara-age s

Shredded cabbage with wasabi dressing

Cucumber sesame dressing

Simmered egg plant

Rice/ miso soup

Matcha pudding

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I usually ask the guests to do the table setting. I believe it is a bit challenging for people who are  not familiar with them but knowing the plate allocation is also good to know Japanese food culture.

Thank you for attending the class. Hope you’ll cook Chicken Kara-age in your kitchen!

Kisshy

Japanese home cooking class on Jul 29th ’16

Thank you for coming my cooking class Ms. A from France, Mr. and Ms. V from Denmark and Mr. E, French man  from India. Wow!  Very international class today!   Their talk went very well in French and the class as a kind of salon for socializing.

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Menus on Jul 29th

Horse Mackerel Nanban-zuke

Cucumber with sesame-vinegar dressing

Sautéed eggplant with red miso paste

Bonito sashimi

Rice and Miso soup

Matcha cake

Fresh bonito is now in season, so I served bonito sashimi as an extra dish since I want guests to taste Japanese seasonal flavor.  Bonito has a strong flavor  so the sashimi commonly served with Japanese herb as garnish, such as grated ginger, shisho leaves, myouga and fresh thin sliced onion.  Also  bonito sashimi go with Ponzu sauce and it always served together.

 It was kind of my “research” to serve little dish of bonito sashimi if non Japanese guests pro to the taste.  Since the  bonito has a strong flavor as I mentioned, and shiso leaves and myouga are Japanese unique flavors too so do people accept those flavor??   As a result , those flavors are accepted today’s all attendees  in this class, and they liked it, yeah!!

I decided I will serve something unique seasonal little dish in my class.  If someone  may not like the flavor, I apporgyze sincerely.  However, I believe it is a kind of an experience to taste what we Japanese eat and appreciate seasonal food in certain season.

I hope enjoy them!

Many thanks,

Kisshy