Ramen Class on October 13th

I welcomed three participants today in the class ; a  couple from Israel and  a man from Mexico, who visited for annual Food Show exhibition.

We made ramen, gyoza and a cucumber dish today for lunch time.  I’m glad our ramen class become popular and we can share many people to cook home made ramen without MSG.

We prepare so much vegetables, so our  ramen and gyoza menus are quite healthy.

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In my class, I  cook braised pork and seasoned egg the day before. Because it is too short time to cook  pork, we call it char shu, in 2 hours our cooking time. I tried to cook it in 2 hours, hopefully I could show how to make the pork from scratch, in the result it is still chewy, the meat is not enough to soft.  So I decide it to prepare the day before. So far the people understand it and enjoy soft and moisture braised pork on ramen noodles.

Today’s participants enjoy cooking ramen, also making gyoza wrapping. Every body try to make nice shape of gyoza, which is fun.

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Look at his well done gyoza flairs and super smiling!

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Then the participants have ramen together with chatting.  Lunch time become social time, the participants enjoy to talk about their different food culture.

 

Many thanks!

Kisshy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sushi roll class : Sushi is Japanese daily meal?

Today is my 4th Sushi lesson in Jul. The participants came from UK and Australia. The lady from UK is an enthusiast for learning maki-zushi, and she brought newly met her friend to the class. Both ladies are lovely and I had great time with them.

Rolling sushi seems difficult that  students in my class say before practice. However, everyone makes beautiful rolls once they get some tips.

People often asks me if  sushi roll is made for daily family meal?  It is depend on the each family but I answer sushi roll is mainly  made for occasional meal, such as celebrating birthday, festivals and ceremonies. Also sushi is convenient for outside meal since you can eat with fingers, without chopsticks. Making Maki-zushi is not a daily meal, too much tasks.

Embarrassingly, I haven’t made sushi roll before I began to teach Japanese cooking for tourists since my culinary background is French cooking….poor excuse!  However, once I get to make rolls it is easier than I expected.  I failed time to time then I got how to make visually nice rolls. I did same experience with the students in my class, so I understand what is difficult points for the first tries.

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I’ m always happy to see the students made great rolls!

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Many Thanks!

Kisshy

Ramen without Dashi broth, still yummy! /June 2017

At this class, one of the guest preferred not to use any seafood. I usually make Dashi stock and pork /chicken stock for making Ramen soup. As you may have heard, Dashi stock  is the backbone for Japanese culinary but it uses smoked bonito fish flakes etc., thus not recommended if you do not like seafood.  But don’t worry, Ramen without Dashi turned out absolutely gorgeous with other seasonings. 

In fact, there are many recipes of Ramen around Japan and the variety just keeps growing all the time.  There are not a few bloggers in Japan who enjoy Ramen shop-hopping and report on each Ramen they tasted.

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Talking about blogs, another guest lady was a food blogger and her page was full of yummy photos. It was a pity I cannot read Spanish or Italian, the language she is writing, but all the photos are really mouth-watering. 

Her lovely daughter was also joining my cooking class. As a youngest participant, she was naturally appointed to hand-mixing of sticky Gyoza fillings, the most tiring part of Gyoza making but she has completed her mission very well.

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The whole family were such foodies that the father, a very skilled vegetable chopper, explained to me some interesting stories about Italian Ravioli making. It was a fun class with lots of food information exchange!

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I hope they enjoyed their time at my kitchen.  Many thanks for coming,

 

Akiko

Private class with an experienced IT cooker /May 2017

Today’s customer had already taken a Japanese home cooking class several years ago and he liked it so much that he wanted to learn more. He was on his business trip to Tokyo so the schedule was a little difficult to sort out but we managed to make it happen! 

His request included mackerel with Miso sauce, eggplant with sweet miso sauce, and we made miso soup, too, along with a few other dishes.

Too much miso? No worries Miso is like cheese for Europeans. There are a great variety of Miso in different regions throughout Japan and even ingredients differ, some uses more rice, others add wheat, or only use salt and soy beans. Each family has its own favorite type of Miso I guess. 

Miso is salty but rich in nutrition and minerals, sich as vitamins, calcium, lactic acid bacteria, oligo saccharide, dietary fiber etc. which help to keep your digestion system in good condition. Some centuries ago, Miso was an important food to carry around for Samurai warriors on expedition, as it keeps for many months without freezing. And most of all, it is yummy! 

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My guest was such an experienced Japanese culinery cooker. He said at his home in UK, he cooks Oyako-Don, a chicken and egg on rice bowl frequently and  his girlfriend (non-Japanese by the way)  loves it, too.  How nice to hear that!

He works for a gigantic IT company so after all our dishes are completed, it was my turn to ask him a lot of questions about latest happenings in his industry.  

I hope he is now enjoying cooking some mackerel and eggplant with various Miso sauces for his loved ones.  Many thanks for coming! 

Akiko

Seafood ramen class on April 14th ’17

Our ramen class is popular and everybody enjoy cooking together and eating as well.

I usually cook ramen with  pork, since pork produces nice flavor and savory taste to the ramen soup.  Pork bones and meat are  necessary common ingredients for making ramen in many ramen shop/bar.

However, I have some request from people  if we can offer  ramen without pork. Some people don’t eat pork because of the  food restrictions and preferences.

So I sometime offer seafood ramen for the class.  I use chicken stock, Japanese dashi and a stock from shrimp shells and that make the soup flavorful and containing savory taste “Umami” without pork.

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Japanese dashi stock,  kelp, dried shiitake, dried sardine soaked in water for over night.

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Combine dashi stock, chicken stock, miso and other ingredients to make  ramen soup.

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Cook salmon, shrimp and vegetable with miso sauce.

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Cook ramen and now assembling for a ramen bowl.

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Well done!

We cook gyoza and cucumber dish at the class and the menu contains tons of vegetables!

Hope you enjoy seafood ramen at the class.

 

Many thanks

Kisshy

 

 

 

Japaneses home cooking in Marh 17th ’17 and Ramen place in kagurazaka

I had a lovely guest from Portugal  today.She likes  cooking and wants to learn Japanese home cooking. We exchanged email in advance about the menu what we cook for the class. She prefers cooking which she can recreate them after she’ll come back to her country.

Eventually we decide to cooked

 

       Menu on March 17th

Mackerel cooked in miso sauce,

Shira-ae ( blanched vegetables mixed with tofu sauce),

Pumpkin cooked in sweet soy sauce,

Rice and miso-soup.

Well balanced!

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As I expected, she has  great cooking skill, cutting / chopping fast and tide. I enjoyed cooking with her and wanted to share all my cooking knowledge.

People who take the cooking class are interested in ingredients, cookery, habit and culture.  I’d always love to answer and share those questions as much as possible in the class. If I couldn’t give the answer I’ll get back to them by email later. It is such delightful to hear when the attendees in my class go  back to their country then have chance to cook Japanese food.

She also tried to visit ramen place “Kimino” in kagurazaka. I always recommend this to attendees to try ramen there.

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The ramen there doesn’t contain MSG-food additives. It is not easy to complete making soup for ramen without MSG, since the compound  produces UMAMI, and that make the ramen taste nicer.

At the beginning of  making ramen recipe for my class, I’ve struggled for making the soup avoiding MSG for a while. I heard the ramen place in kagurazaka by chance which doesn’t contain any food additives.

I visited the place right after I heard. The tiny ramen restaurant is located on cozy, narrow street in Kagurazaka.  Inside of the bar is clean and well hygiene,  and has warm-welcomed atmosphere.

The ramen there was just impressive. The madam there recommend me to have all the soup.  She said the soup doesn’t contain so much salt, ( and of course no chemical added) so it’s good for you.  The madam is warm, open minded lady. She also gave me a plenty of advise to make nice soup at home.

Although I haven’t herd the recipe in the ramen bar, I appreciate her that she is my big help for the ramen class nicer, people come to cook and said  delicious eventually.

Today’s guest was the first who visited the place. She had a good time, good ramen there according to her report.  I appreciate it, very much!  I’m looking forward to hearing your Japanese cooking report in Lisbon again.

P.S Thank you for the wonderful review on Trip Advisor!

Ciao!

Kisshy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ramen class on Oct 7th ’16

We have a ramen class today.

I accepted special requests as “No sea food”, ” no pork” for the menus. Usually I use sautéed minced pork  as well as braised pork for the ramen garnish. unique pork flavor produces savory umami taste so that it is one of the fundamental ingredient for the bowl in most of ramen shop.

*However, there diverse population from different countries visit Japan now a days so some ramen shop produce ramen without pork.

http://www.feeljapank.com/halal/halal-tokyo02.html

 

I prepared ground chicken and braised chicken for those guests and we cooked both chicken and pork in the class.  I usually very careful to serve specific religion food and allergy food for each requested guests and I also ask all the participants to  cooperate do the process securely.  I appreciate the guests all the time they are cooperative with kind.

Ramen menu on Oct 7th ’16

Pork/chicken Miso ramen ( garnish with sautéed vegetables, sautéed  minced pork/chicken, braised pork/chicken,  simmered egg)

Pork / Chicken Gyoza

Cucumber sweet sour sesame dressing

Green tea pudding/agar-agar

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I’m always glad when the guests say “good taste” for the ramen since it takes many times of practice for making recipe.

Many thanks for today’s guests from Australia and Israel!

Kisshy

 

 

 

 

Jul 27th ’16 Halal food cooking

Today’s class was requested by Japanese woman, Ms. M, who wants to give a class to her Egyptian employee, Ms.D.  Very kind boss!

Ms. M and I take time to decide the menu; what we can cook as Halal food for Ms. D, I decide to cook Tempura, since her food restrictions are either  no alcohol  no pork.

    Today’s menu  Jul 27th ’16

Tempura

various kinds of salt (matcha, seakelp, shiso flavor)

Cucumber sesame vinegar dressing

Steamed eggplant with bonito flakes

Bonito sashimi

rice and miso soup

Matcha cake

I’ve  tested several times to make nice Japanese dashi seasoning without sake and mirin.  Sake and mirin are fundamental seasonings for Japanese food. Finally I found out using mixed dried dashi ( mackerel, shiitake, bonito and sea kelp) instead of using simply dried bonito flakes.  The mixture produces  the complexity of Umami flavor to dashi stock.

I also prepared matcha salt, sea kelp powder and salt and shiso flavored salt as accompany for tempura.

I’m so glad to hear that Ms. M gave me email later, Ms. D enjoyed the class very much.   I did enjoy the class very much, too!

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Many thanks!

Kisshy