Flower bud as a spring delicacy on April 24th Tempura class

I welcomed a from Quebec, and the lady turned out to be a professional working at the culinary institute. Her husband had lived in Tokyo for some years before and very knowledgeable our food culture so I was quite nervous not to disappoint them with my cookings. 

Both of them were such lovely , who really enjoy cooking. We were chatting and chatting about all kinds of foods and it was such a fun time!

They liked and my easy side dish of crushed cucumbers very much, while they told me that sweet egg roll was a little strange taste for them, as omelet is always savory. It is truly interesting to know what is appealing and what is not so.

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 For this Tempura occasion, I picked up our popular spring , called ‘Fuki no Tou’ as one of the ingredients for deep frying. I googled up the English translation of Fuki, which was ‘butterbur scape’ or Petasites japonicas.  Does it make sense?  Maybe it is not eaten much outside Japan.  Here is a photo of Fuki no Tou.

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Fuki is a kind of vegetable and it looks like Rhubarb but the taste is totally different. Only around spring time, buds of Fuki flowers are available and I like to eat them as Tempura. It has some bitterness along freshness, appreciated as a sign of early spring nutrition.

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My guests from Quebec liked Fuki no Tou, as well as prawns, eggplants, Shiso leaves, Okura, Kabocha pumpkins etc. I hope they enjoyed their cooking at my as much as I did.

Many thanks for coming!

Akiko

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